Neurogenesis and the septotemporal axis at #SFN11

As I’ve alluded, science, and therefore the SFN meeting where much science is unveiled, is a cycle of confusion and clarification. Currently, confusion may be prevailing in the adult hippocampal neurogenesis field since new neurons have been implicated in everything mammals do – spatial and nonspatial memory, anxiety, depression, addiction,…

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What I learned while presenting at #SFN11

It’s hard to explore SFN when you’ve got your own poster to tend to. I thought I could hop around the development section before things got busy but there was no “before things got busy.” The design of the conference also can work against presenters because the presentations you’d like…

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Saturday Nov 12, #SFN11, poster A27 = me

Update: The poster is now available at Nature Precedings. Still acquiring histological images for my SfN poster. My recurring problem is that I end up taking pictures of things because they’re pretty and not because they have anything to do with the task at hand. Today’s case in point: Well,…

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SFN 2011 Neuroblogging

The annual most insanely huge neuroscience meeting is rapidly approaching and I am pleased to announce that I will be blogging about the meeting again this year, here at Functional Neurogenesis. The meeting will be held at the Washington DC convention center, located in “China” town, which is cool because in…

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DATA: Stress can increase or decrease anxiety depending on the timing of the stressor

The following data can be cited using this permanent identifier: hdl.handle.net/10779/7d8f2506fc029d16eeffd1350c42980a. You can also find a PDF of the complete data and text there. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the immediate and delayed effects of stress on anxiety/depressive behavior. For the open field and elevated plus maze experiments…

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How to share all of your data

Figshare is one of the greatest new tools for scientists. It allows you to publish any piece of data, no matter how small or insignificant, in a citable fashion. This is a big deal because ALL scientists have (tons of) data of this sort. Pilot experiments are performed to get the…

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In press: The neurogenesis-depression hypothesis, confirmed.

The idea that adult neurogenesis protects individuals from depression is perhaps the single greatest motivator driving neurogenesis research. Not surprisingly, “neurogenesis depression” is the most common behavioral keyword that brings people to this blog (followed closely by “pattern separation”). So I’m excited to say that we will soon be publishing what (I…

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Dorsoventral vs. Septotemporal hippocampus

Everybody knows what the hippocampus is for: memory. And…maybe something about anxiety or depression? Yes – over the last 10 years or so many studies have been published showing that the hippocampus has these two roles and that the mnemonic and emotional functions of the hippocampus are associated with its…

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Random roundup

“Random” roundup because any posts linking to articles or ideas I’ve recently found noteworthy will never occur on a regular basis (as others manage to do – I applaud you) but only when enough interesting material has accrued and I have a spare moment. The links will, however, not be…

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Are new neurons really more excitable? (yes)

Some facts on neuronal excitability: Excitable: the ability to fire action potentials. More excitable: fires action potentials, but more. More LTP: not the same as more excitable. Less inhibition: also not the same as more excitable, though the two may go hand in hand. The Scholarpedia page on neuronal excitability,…

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How does the brain pick which neurons to use?

Wiring. That’s one answer to this question. We know this from topographic maps in the thalamus and neocortex, where the basic units of sensory information are neatly represented in spatially-arranged populations of neurons – the various body parts are represented in specific locations, as are the different frequencies of sound, the different…

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Keystone Symposium on Adult Neurogenesis (2011)

It’s surprising that it’s 2011 and there’s no regular meeting on adult neurogenesis. There have been neurogenesis sessions at other meetings and perhaps the occasional, sometimes closed, neurogenesis meeting here and there, but nothing regular for all to attend. This Keystone meeting on adult neurogenesis will hopefully mark the end…

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